Why Spay/Neuter is important 

One of the most important health decisions you’ll make as a cat guardian is to spay or neuter your cat. Learn more by reading our Spay/Neuter Information Sheet.

 

If you live in Surrey and need help with the cost of spay/neuter, apply to our Spay/Neuter Program. 

How can I be a responsible cat guardian?

Please schedule a spay or neuter for your cat at your local vet or at one of our recommended vets. Ensure your cat also gets an ear tattoo or microchip, so they can be located if they go missing. And if you let your cat go outdoors, make sure they are wearing a collar with an ID tag with their name and your phone number.

 

Why should I care?

Every time a litter is born, it lowers the chance that others will be adopted because competition for homes increases. Kittens who aren’t adopted grow up to be homeless adult cats suffering on the streets or brought into shelters and killed. 

 

But with spaying or neutering (spay/neuter), fewer kittens are born, competition for homes is reduced, there is less suffering for stray and abandoned cats, and lives are saved through prevention. 

 

What is spaying and neutering?

Spaying and neutering are safe surgical procedures performed by a veterinarian to prevent pets from reproducing. In a female animal, spaying consists of removing the uterus and ovaries. For a male animal, neutering involves the removal of the testicles. Sterilization, fixing, and altering are also common terms for spay and neuter.

 

Spay/neuter is the most humane and effective method for reducing the number of homeless cats and also provides cats with significant health and behavioral benefits. 

These stray eight-week-old kittens siblings were rescued from the outdoors in January 2016 and spayed when they turned five months old, the ideal age for kittens to be fixed.

What are the benefits?

Your cat will live a longer, healthier life. 

For female cats, spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast cancer, which is fatal in 90 per cent of cats. Spaying your cat before her first heat offers the best protection from these diseases. For male cats, if done before six months of age, neutering prevents testicular cancer.

 

Your spayed female won't go into heat.

While cycles can vary, female felines usually go into heat lasting seven to 10 days every three weeks during breeding season. In an effort to advertise for mates, they'll yowl and urinate more frequently—sometimes all over the house!

 

Your neutered male will be better behaved.

Unneutered cats may mark their territory by spraying strong-smelling urine all over the house. Neutered cats focus their attention on their human families, and many aggression problems can be avoided by early neutering.

 

It is highly cost-effective.

The cost of your cat's spay/neuter surgery is a lot less than the cost of having and caring for a litter. 

 

What about all the negative things I hear about spay/neuter?

Read about the five most common myths about spaying and neutering and why they aren't true.  

 

When should spay/neuter be done?

Most unintentional litters happen because people waited too long to have the surgery done. The recommended age for cats is five months. Your veterinarian should be consulted to determine the best time for your cat.

 

Where can I get more information?

For more information on spaying or neutering your cat, visit the BC SPCA website

 

How can I do my part and be a responsible cat guardian?

Please schedule a spay or neuter for your cat at your local vet. Ensure your cat also gets an ear tattoo or microchip, so they can be located if they go missing. And if you let your cat go outdoors, make sure they are wearing a collar with an ID tag with their name and your phone number.

 

I need financial help to get my cat spayed/neutered, but I don't live in Surrey. Who can help me?

You can apply to SpayAid, funded by Paws for Hope Animal Foundation. Additional resources are listed on the BC SPCA website.

© 2020 Surrey Community Cat Foundation

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